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Non-Management System

"5S" Housekeeping

What is 5S?

5S is a system for organizing spaces so work can be performed efficiently, effectively, and safely. This system focuses on putting everything where it belongs and keeping the workplace clean, which makes it easier for people to do their jobs without wasting time or risking injury.


5S Translation

    The term 5S comes from five Japanese words:

  • Seiri
  • Seiton
  • Seiso
  • Seiketsu
  • Shitsuke

    In English, these words are often translated to:

  • Sort
  • Set in Order
  • Shine
  • Standardize
  • Sustain

Each S represents one part of a five-step process that can improve the overall function of a business.

Lean Six Sigma

Lean Six Sigma is a method that relies on a collaborative team effort to improve performance by systematically removing waste and reducing variation. It combines lean manufacturing/lean enterprise and Six Sigma to eliminate the eight kinds of waste (Muda): Defects, Over-Production, Waiting, Non-Utilized Talent, Transportation, Inventory, Motion, and Extra-Processing.

Lean Six Sigma not only reduces process defects and waste, but also provides a framework for overall organizational culture change.[2] By introducing Lean Six Sigma, the mindset of employees and managers change to one that focuses on growth and continuous improvement through process optimization. This change in culture and the mindset of an organization maximizes efficiency and increases profitability.

In order to successfully implement Lean Six Sigma, a combination of tools from both lean manufacturing and Six Sigma must be used. Some of these tools include kaizen, value-stream mapping, line balancing, and visual management.

7 Quality Tools

The seven basic tools of quality are a designation given to a fixed set of graphical techniques identified as being most helpful in troubleshooting issues related to quality. They are called basic because they are suitable for people with little formal training in statistics and because they can be used to solve the vast majority of quality-related issues.

    The seven tools are:

  • Cause-and-effect diagram (also known as the "fishbone diagram" or Ishikawa diagram)
  • Check sheet
  • Control chart
  • Histogram
  • Pareto chart
  • Scatter diagram
  • Stratification

GMP Certification

Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) is a term that is recognized worldwide for the control and management of manufacturing, testing and overall quality control of food and pharmaceutical products. GMP takes quality assurance approach, which ensures that products are consistently produced and controlled to the quality standards appropriate to their intended use and as required by the marketing authorization.

GMP addresses issues including documentation, record keeping, personnel qualifications, sanitation, cleanliness, equipment verification, process validation, and complaint handling. Most GMP requirements are very general and open ended, allowing each manufacturer to decide individually how to best implement the necessary controls.

The quality approach of GMP ensures manufacturing, enabling companies to minimize or eliminate instances of contamination, mix-ups, and errors. This in turn, protects the consumer from purchasing a product, which is not effective or even dangerous. Failure of firms to comply with GMP regulations can result in very serious consequences including recall, seizure, fines, and jail time.

It is believed that GMP is a good business tool, which will help to refine both compliance and performance of the Company. GMP requirements are largely common-sense practices, which will help companies better itself as it moves toward a quality approach using continuous improvement.

HACCP Certification

HACCP certification instantly demonstrates to customers your commitment to producing or trading in safe food. This evidence-based approach can be particularly beneficial when you are subject to inspection by regulatory authorities or stakeholders.

Demonstrating a real commitment to food safety through HACCP compliance can also transform your brand and act as an effective entry-to-market tool, opening up new business opportunities around the world.

Our global network of food experts carries out HACCP audits and helps you focus on the hazards that affect food safety and hygiene. It is then possible to systematically identify where the hazards are by setting up control limits at critical points during the food production process.

    HACCP certification is an international standard defining the requirements for effective control of food safety. It is built around seven principles:

  • Conduct Hazard Analysis of biological, chemical or physical food hazards
  • Determine critical control points
  • Establish critical control limits, for example, minimum cooking temperature and time
  • Establish a system to monitor control of Critical Control Points
  • Establish corrective actions
  • Establish procedure for verification to confirm that the HACCP system is working effectively
  • Establish documentation and record keeping

“Work with us to achieve HACCP compliance and meet the expectations of a changing world”.

SEDEX

SESEX is one of the world’s leading ethical trade service providers, working to improve working conditions in global supply chains. We provide practical tools, services and a community network to help companies improve their responsible and sustainable business practices, and source responsibly.

SEDEX is a not for profit membership organisation dedicated to driving improvements in ethical and responsible business practices in global supply chains. SEDEX is a web-based system designed to help organizations manage data on labour practices in their supply chain. Members have the benefit of being able to publish their SMETA audit reports directly on the SEDEX system for viewing by all customers.

SEDEX members have agreed the Best Practice Guide, a common methodology to improve audit standards and promote mutual acceptance of audit reports. In addition to the principles in the ETI Base Code, SMETA also review performance against the right to work of migrant workers, management systems and implementation, sub-contracting and home working and environmental issues. The aim is to ease the burden on suppliers facing multiple audits, questionnaires and certifications and to drive improvements in the ethical performance of global supply chains.

    SEDEX focuses on four key areas:

  • Labour Standards
  • Health and Safety
  • The Environment
  • Business Ethics

BSCI

The BSCI is the European social monitoring system for ethical sourcing initiated by the Brussels-based Foreign Trade Association (FTA). BSCI is a business-driven initiative for companies committed to improving working conditions in the global supply chain. BSCI unites hundreds of companies around one common Code of Conduct and supports them in their efforts to build an ethical supply chain by providing them with a step-by-step development- oriented system, applicable to all sectors and all sourcing countries.

BSCI Code of Conduct is built on the most important International Conventions protecting workers' rights, notably the ILO Conventions and recommendations. All BSCI participants commit to implement the Code in their supply chains. BSCI supports companies by providing them with a range of interlinked activities and tools to achieve a socially compliant supply chain.

    The 11 principles of the Code of Conduct that BSCI participants commit to implement in their supply chains are:

  • The rights to Freedom of Association and Collective Bargaining
  • No Discrimination
  • Fair Remuneration
  • Decent Working Hours
  • Occupational Health and Safety
  • No Child Labour
  • Protection of Young Workers
  • No Precarious Employment
  • No Bonded Labour
  • Protection of the Environment
  • Ethical Business Behaviour

The SA8000 Standard

The SA8000 Standard is based on internationally recognized standards of decent work, including the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, ILO conventions, and national laws. SA8000 applies a management-systems approach to social performance and emphasizes continual improvement—not checklist-style auditing.

    Elements of the Standard:

  • Child Labour
  • Forced or Compulsory Labour
  • Health and Safety
  • Freedom of Association & Right to Collective Bargaining
  • Discrimination
  • Disciplinary Practices
  • Working Hours
  • Remuneration
  • Management System

What Is a Social Audit?

A social audit is a formal review of a company's endeavors, procedures, and code of conduct regarding social responsibility and the company's impact on society. A social audit is an assessment of how well the company is achieving its goals or benchmarks for social responsibility.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

  • A social audit is a formal review of a company's endeavors, procedures, and code of conduct regarding social responsibility and the company's impact on society.
  • A social audit is an assessment of how well the company is achieving its goals or benchmarks for social responsibility.
  • Ideally, companies aim to strike a balance between profitability and social responsibility.

Items Examined in a Social Audit

The scope of a social audit can vary and be wide-ranging. The assessment can include social and public responsibility but also employee treatment. Some of the guidelines and topics that comprise a social audit include the following:

  • Environmental impact resulting from the company's operations
  • Transparency in reporting any issues regarding the effect on the public or environment.
  • Accounting and financial transparency
  • Community development and financial contributions
  • Charitable giving
  • Volunteer activity of employees
  • Energy use or impact on footprint
  • Work environment including safety, free of harassment, and equal opportunity
  • Worker pay and benefits
  • Non-discriminatory practices
  • Diversity

Buyer Compliance requirements- Consulting

Coming soon